MSU Indigenous Law and Policy Center Hosts Two-Day Conference

Thursday, October 10, 2019, 9:22 am
By: 
Mark Meyer

The 16th annual Indigenous Law and Policy Center and Tribal In-House Counsel Association’s Indigenous Law Conference takes place today and Friday, Oct.11, at the Michigan State University College of Law.

Chrissi Ross Nimmo (pictured above), deputy attorney general for her Cherokee Nation tribe and lead counsel in Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl (known as “baby Veronica”), is this year’s keynote speaker.

  • Lessons from Standing Rock-Criminal Defense and Civil Litigation
  • Tribal Employment and #MeToo
  • Tribal NAILS Programs/Legal Aid
  • Diversifying the Legal Profession
  • Secret Life of Litigators
  • Ethics in and out of Indian Country: Transitioning Roles

The City of East Lansing celebrated Indigenous People’s Day for the first time ever on the second Monday in October 2016. That year City Council passed a resolution declaring that the federal holiday named after Christopher Columbus will instead be identified by the City as Indigenous People’s Day in recognition “of Odawa, Ojibwe, and Potawatomi Indigenous Nations who have lived upon this land since time immemorial” and “the progress our society has accomplished through Native American thought and culture.”

“Indigenous People” is the increasingly preferred terminology for the people who have alternatively been called Native American and American Indians.

The East Lansing Human Relations Commission drafted the resolution over a period of about one year, beginning in late fall of 2015 — around the same time that the cities of Lawrence, Kan., and Portland, Ore., passed Indigenous People’s Day resolutions.

Although many cities and municipalities across the United States have established some kind of holiday for indigenous people, not all of them have explicitly replaced Columbus Day.

Visit the Turtle Talk blog for up-to-the-minute information about the conference.

eastlansinginfo.org © 2013-2020 East Lansing Info